Can Tea Tree Oil Actually Prevent Hair Loss? We Asked Dermatologists

0
133

“Hearst Magazines and Yahoo may earn commissions or revenue for some articles through these links.”

Essential oils have many benefits. Tea tree oil, in particular, is one of the most popular options due to its potentially healing properties. Extracted from the leaves of the tea tree, native to Australia, the oil has been used as a natural germ killer and medicinal for decades, according to the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health.

Meet our experts: Toyin Falola, MD, board-certified dermatologist at Ro, Brendan Camp, MD, FAAD, dual board-certified dermatologist at MDCS Dermatology in New York City, and clinical assistant professor of dermatology at Weill Cornell Medical College

It is also another oil that has found its way into hair care products for its purported benefits, including treating lice and scalp conditions. But according to Toyin Falola, MD, a board-certified dermatologist at Ro, there’s a lack of scientific evidence to fully back up these claims, and if you’re curious about whether or not you should add tea tree oil to your hair care routine, WH has you covered with all the details, Benefits, safety tips and more informed.

The benefits of using tea tree oil for hair

Before you buy and use tea tree oil, you should make sure that it is the right product for your needs. Check out some of the top benefits of tea tree oil, according to dermatologists, below.

  • It can help with dandruff: Tea tree oil has antifungal properties that can fight yeast or yeast-related conditions like seborrheic dermatitis, commonly known as dandruff. Symptoms of dandruff include scaly, pink, and itchy patches on the scalp, ears, and eyebrows. “Tea tree oil can potentially treat skin fungi like Malassezia, which also play a role in yeast formation [dandruff]says Brendan Camp, MD, a dual board dermatologist at MDCS Dermatology in New York City.

  • It helps to balance oil production: Depending on your hair type, an oily scalp can be a common problem. If you’re not sure, consider how often your hair feels greasy or weighed down. There are many factors that contribute to how much oil your scalp produces, but the good news is that tea tree oil can help balance it all out. “Tea tree oil can balance oil production on the scalp, which may help [dandruff] “Tea tree oil does not reduce sebum (oil) buildup, but it may help reduce the effects of bacteria, yeast, and inflammation that contribute to scalp folliculitis.”

  • It *could* support hair growth and prevent hair loss: As previously mentioned, not all claims made about tea tree oil are backed by science. And when it comes to hair growth or hair loss, the decision is not yet clear. “While some sources claim that tea tree oil can promote both hair growth and strengthening, there is no scientific evidence conclusively linking the two,” says Dr. falola Instead, she recommends turning to ingredients like tretinoin, minoxidil, and melatonin—all clinically proven ingredients to directly support hair growth, slow hair loss, and support thicker hair. Still, it’s the antioxidants found in tea tree oil that make people believe in its ability to prevent hair loss. Oxidative stress is also known to play a role in premature hair loss, according to a 2018 study in the International Journal of Trichology. “Tea tree oil’s antioxidant properties may help mitigate the effects of oxygen free radicals,” says Dr. camp. He points out that oxygen free radicals are often generated by normal cellular metabolism and exposure to pollution and UV radiation.

  • It has anti-inflammatory properties: This can be especially helpful for anyone struggling with a red and itchy scalp or conditions like psoriasis, contact dermatitis, or generally dry skin, says Dr. camp.

Possible risks of using tea tree oil for hair

Tea tree oil is a very powerful ingredient and should never be applied directly to the skin as it can be an irritant and cause allergic reactions. “Using a scalp oil with a higher concentration may put you at a higher risk of skin irritation,” says Dr. camp. “It’s important to dilute it with a carrier oil before using it.” Some popular examples of carrier oils include argan and jojoba oil.

To determine if you’re allergic, do a quick test by applying a small amount of diluted tea tree oil to the inside of your arm, recommends Dr. camp. He adds that people with sensitive skin have a history of more reactions, so it’s best to check beforehand.

Tea tree oil also comes in different forms. So if you plan to use it on your hair, make sure the tea tree oil you buy is an essential oil and not an oil used for fragrance purposes.

Also, you shouldn’t rely solely on tea tree oil if you’re looking to improve the moisture, strength, or length of your hair. “A common mistake is to assume that because tea tree oil is sometimes included or advertised as a hair growth supplement, it is clinically proven to promote hair growth,” says Dr. falola While tea tree oil may be on a hair care product’s ingredient list, it’s likely that your hair will benefit more from some other additives.

If you experience symptoms of overexposure such as redness, itching, flaking or stinging, consult your dermatologist.

How to use tea tree oil on your hair

  • Dilute it: Always dilute your tea tree oil with another ingredient to avoid irritation. “There are many recipes, but one that is often repeated is to add 1-2 drops of tea tree oil to 12 drops of carrier oil,” says Dr. camp. (Opt for neutral options like almond oil or coconut oil.) After combining the oils, apply the mixture to damp scalp and massage in as a leave-in treatment.

  • Add it to your shampoo: If you’re adding it to a shampoo, lather it up for about three to five minutes before rinsing it out

  • Add it to a hair mask: Pair it with a hair mask to moisturize your hair follicles while treating flaky skin on the scalp, says Dr. camp.

Understandably, the idea of ​​creating a mix yourself can be intimidating. In this case, you can buy ready-made hair care products that contain tea tree oil.

Tea Tree Special Conditioner


<p><a href=Shopping now

Tea Tree Special Conditioner

$48.00

amazon.com

” data-src=”https://s.yimg.com/ny/api/res/1.2/liPyevTHW.IU8E4tIGcyZg–/YXBwaWQ9aGlnaGxhbmRlcjt3PTEyNDI7aD0xMjQy/https://media.zenfs.com/en/aol_womens_health_917/715aeee68c008 1 25c5ea9a5f7eccf329″/ >

Shopping now

Tea Tree Special Conditioner

$48.00

amazon.com

Tea Tree Oil Shampoo


<p><a href=Shopping now

Tea Tree Oil Shampoo

$11.49

amazon.com

” data-src=”https://s.yimg.com/ny/api/res/1.2/y0C_.7EO0Acc7wqMkJZNiA–/YXBwaWQ9aGlnaGxhbmRlcjt3PTEyNDI7aD0xMjQy/https://media.zenfs.com/en/aol_womens_health_917/9c579dbc787 c7 a80e418676808654285″/ >

Shopping now

Tea Tree Oil Shampoo

$11.49

amazon.com

Scalp Revival Charcoal + Tea Tree Cooling Hydration Scalp Mask


<p><a href=Shopping now

Scalp Revival Charcoal + Tea Tree Cooling Hydration Scalp Mask

$34.00

amazon.com

” data-src=”https://s.yimg.com/ny/api/res/1.2/iqR8cxzvSBsrKEqqOfs32g–/YXBwaWQ9aGlnaGxhbmRlcjt3PTEyNDI7aD0xMjQy/https://media.zenfs.com/en/aol_womens_health_917/0f3dc847fec6 824ba4e9d38e2dc3bdfd”/>

Shopping now

Scalp Revival Charcoal + Tea Tree Cooling Hydration Scalp Mask

$34.00

amazon.com

Tea Tree Essential Oil


<p><a href=Shopping now

Tea Tree Essential Oil

$11.99

amazon.com

” data-src=”https://s.yimg.com/ny/api/res/1.2/IpsJzakER0gHa8ScOwavLg–/YXBwaWQ9aGlnaGxhbmRlcjt3PTEyNDI7aD0xMjQy/https://media.zenfs.com/en/aol_womens_health_917/11637c5834201f da a9bb503ada300b1f”/>

Shopping now

Tea Tree Essential Oil

$11.99

amazon.com

Organic Sweet Almond Oil


<p><a href=Shopping now

Organic Sweet Almond Oil

$9.99

amazon.com

” data-src=”https://s.yimg.com/ny/api/res/1.2/wYiwQNigGgMoAUPN3O7xBw–/YXBwaWQ9aGlnaGxhbmRlcjt3PTEyNDI7aD0xMjQy/https://media.zenfs.com/en/aol_womens_health_917/78d846ae5ab5 7db 0fef484b853a4923a”/>

Shopping now

Organic Sweet Almond Oil

$9.99

amazon.com

How often can I use tea tree oil on my hair?

Sensitive skin or not, too much tea tree oil can cause overexposure, so don’t overdo it. “The pure form of tea tree oil should not be used more than two to three times a week because of the risk of skin irritation. ” says Dr. camp. “Skin care products that contain tea tree oil as an ingredient may be suitable for daily use.”

If you’re concerned about how often to use it based on your specific needs, it’s always a safe bet to consult your dermatologist for a more customized recommendation.

You May Also Like

www.aol.com

https://www.aol.com/tea-tree-oil-actually-prevent-120000844.html